Monday, November 24, 2008

Poll-Release Monday #61

Here is the new poll question for this week:

True or False?: In the liturgy it is not only the Father who blesses us, but we who bless the Father.
What do you think? Vote in the poll in the sidebar.

Here are the results from the previous poll:
  • Proper song and music in the liturgy, although acting as signs in regard to liturgical action, are not elements that promote the sanctification of the faithful.
    • True: 3 (10%)
    • False: 26 (90%)
The correct answer is:
  • FALSE, cf. CCC no. 1157: Song and music fulfill their function as signs in a manner all the more significant when they are "more closely connected . . . with the liturgical action" (SC 112 § 3), according to three principal criteria: beauty expressive of prayer, the unanimous participation of the assembly at the designated moments, and the solemn character of the celebration. In this way they participate in the purpose of the liturgical words and actions: the glory of God and the sanctification of the faithful (Cf. SC 112) . . .
You may wonder how it is that song and music in the liturgy can promote the sanctification of the faithful. I have wondered this myself. Perhaps liturgical music acts as sacramentals do, nurturing in us the proper disposition with which to receive God's grace. Of course, in the Mass, liturgical music prepares us to receive the Body of Christ in the Eucharist.

St. Cecilia, patron saint of musicians .... pray for us!

Pax Christi,
phatcatholic

1 comment:

Hidden One said...

Music, as in my case in my early ears - in Protestantism - was significant to my development as a Christian because of the dogmatic and moral theology it contained, enough of which was solid enough that, having since converted [obviously], I have learned/heard remarkably few pieces that I had not already sung [at least versions of].

Of course, your other point is well made: most of what I have learned since my conversion isn't really worth it, and most of the stuff I already know that I've sung at Mass is dubiously liturgical.

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